Untitled

somewhatreal:

Nate Frizzell, Every Moment with Her was a Moment to Keep, Oil on canvas, 28x20”. 2010.

Nate Frizzell, The Way We Should Go. Oil on canvas, 20x28”. 2010.

Nate Frizzell, She Used To Search the Sky. Oil on canvas, 20x28”. 2010.

Nate Frizzell, The Secret of Being Colorful. Oil on canvas, 36x24”. 2010.

Nate Frizzell, Waiting To Be Unseen. Oil on canvas, 30x40”. 2010.

Nate Frizzell, To See Her as You’d See a Star. Oil on canvas, 20x28”. 2010.

He takes several motifs—animals, humans, winter, graffiti, masks—and spins them in different ways to explore them from different perspectives. I think the paintings’ titles are particularly interesting because they convey so much story without going too far.

letstalkpaper:

paper installations by Andreas Kocks, multiple layers of paper in black and white

mythologyofblue:

René Magritte

mythologyofblue:

René Magritte

thenakedbrowneye:

I ♥ HK (by TGKW)

thenakedbrowneye:

I ♥ HK (by TGKW)


Michal Pudelka
oxane:

May 13th 2011 - 169 - Trans Flux Kenneth Noland (1963) by Mr Puma x]
Today we draw inspiration from Kenneth Noland’s Trans Flux (1963). He  was an abstract painter although sometimes included with abstract  expressionist painters. His works explore color and shape while  experimenting with thin acryllic based paints that were almost  impossible to change after the paint was layed on the canvas thus him  referring to his works as “one shot” paintings. He began  working with chevron or v-shaped paintings and at first covered the  entire canvas with paint. As time grew on, he started to leave some  parts of the canvas untouched juxtaposing painted and unpainted surfaces  on the canvas.

oxane:

May 13th 2011 - 169 - Trans Flux Kenneth Noland (1963) by Mr Puma x]

Today we draw inspiration from Kenneth Noland’s Trans Flux (1963). He was an abstract painter although sometimes included with abstract expressionist painters. His works explore color and shape while experimenting with thin acryllic based paints that were almost impossible to change after the paint was layed on the canvas thus him referring to his works as “one shot” paintings.

He began working with chevron or v-shaped paintings and at first covered the entire canvas with paint. As time grew on, he started to leave some parts of the canvas untouched juxtaposing painted and unpainted surfaces on the canvas.

raccoonology:

by Sophie Van der Perre